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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
this was going on but once the snowden documents came out, they had to deal with it politically at home. >> what should they do to handle that? how can we help them at hope, mary? >> i prefer the kind of -- sort of things that senator feinstein is suggesting, which really aren't major changes in the way the policy would work. the fact of the matter is everybody spies. the french intelligence, former french head of intelligence came out last week and said, what are you talking about, everybody's been doing this. helmut schmidt said when he was chancellor of germany he assumed he was being spied on. this has been going on since the cold war. so basically yes, maybe we should provide some cosmetic cover in order to help, for example, merkel regain some trust in the relationship with the u.s. beyond that, i don't think we should do anything. >> dianne feinstein being the chairman of the senate intelligence committee. she's moving some legislation to put some -- a review of all of these things. there's also a report this week, joe, that the nsa was spying, breaking into google and yahoo! networks ove
merkel's phone and allowed it to continue. it came out after edward snowden said the u.s. has spied on world leaders. what president obama spoke to chancellor merkel when the two spoke about the spying. >> the president said we're not going to do this going forward. >> but it may have been done in the past. >> we don't want to get into the business of inventorying everything we've done in the past but what we're looking at is how can we both make necessary reforms in how we gather intelligence and how can we be more transparent about what we're doing with our allies and the public. >> joining me now ambassador mark ginsburg. it's great to have you here. the white house finds itself caught between a rock and a hard place. now they have to come out and ask for forgiveness as opposed to permission, because they never would have gotten permission to do this. but this is not unheard of. this is what we do as a country. >> spies r us. >> we've been doing it for a long time. is it just the fact that we are surprised that it would get to this level and now expect to believe that the white h
to foreign communications. you know, when the snowden documents started to come out -- >> snowden being the leaker. >> edward snowden being the leaker. we were talking about domestic spying and snooping on americans. here you have purely foreign intelligence and suddenly that's a crime as well. it's kind of an indication of the moving goalpost. >> domestically the political back lash. there are -- >> against the nsa -- >> there's sensenbrenner in the house -- >> especially when there's legislation to stop the nsa from data collection, let the aclu basically argue why certain things shouldn't be done. and to really handcuff our intelligence services the way that it happened in the 1970s, which indirectly led up to our failures that led to 9/11. >> how big a danger is that, mary? >> well, it's, i think it's possible that, you know, you're going to get some momentum. but it's incredibly naive. i mean, you know, is this -- if the u.s. stops doing this, then it woen be happening anymore. basically if the u.s. stops doing it then the only ones doing it will be the chinese, the russians, you k
about the fallout from the edward snowden leaks. >> this is the most serious leak, most serious compromise in the u.s. intelligence committee. >> because of the amount of it and the type. >> the amount and the type. >> website reboot. secretary of hhs kathleen sebelius faces questions on capitol hill wednesday after healthcare.gov went down over the weekend adding fuel to the criticism and more fodder for snl. >> i have a number of friendly tips to help you deal with those problems. for example, have you tried restarting your computer. sometimes it helps to turn the computer off and turn it back on. we don't know why. it just does. >> poetic license, the literally legend maya angelou joins us this hour. children's love for books. >> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. edward snowden's leaks keep coming faster than the white house can even respond. over the weekend the nsa claimed president obama had no idea angela merkel's personal cell phone was tapped back since 2002. so how credible is that denial? joining me now is chuck todd nbc's white house correspondent, politic
controversy continues to spread. in the wakeover it, edward snowden has had a meeting with a german legislator the, present that person with a letter, speaking the truth is not a crime, i am confident that with the support of the international community the government of united states will abandon this harmful practice. he's seeking some kind of clemency. are there any conditions under which president obama would consider clemency? >> none that have been discussed. >> none at all? >> none. >> it's not on the table? >> it's not been on the table. mr. snowden violated u.s. law. our belief has always been that he should return to the united states and face justice. >> finally, rand paul is our next guest, senator rand paul, do you agree with jay carney your white house colleague, that it would be awesome if rand paul ran for president in 2016? >> i suspect that the the 2016 republican nomination is going to be awesome no matter who runs. >> okay, dan pfeiffer, thanks very much. >>> let's go to senator rand paul right there. you heard dan pfeiffer say it's going to be an awesome race. are you goin
.s. surveillance abroad. the material handed over to a reporter by nsa leaker edward snowden and it's providing a seemingly endless stream of revelations. those revelations are rocking america's relationships with some of its closest allies. christiane amanpour is joining us right now. you just spoke to the reporter who has been breaking all of these edward snowden leaks. what did he just tell you? >> reporter: well, first of all, they have thousands and thousands of documents but also, that he just simply rejects what, for instance, mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee, british prime minister david cameron, many, many u.s. and other allied officials are saying, which is that this is dangerous, what they're doing, that they are putting all sorts of people at risk, they are compromising all sorts of abilities to close down terrorist cells and plots and this and that. he rejects that and always has. this is what he said to me on that. >> every terrorist who is capable of tying their own shoes has long known that the u.s. government and the uk government are trying to monitor
about -- tell us about this drawing that was leaked alodge with some other edward snowden documents. does it show how the nsa broke into google. >> >> yes, think of google as having multiple data centers around the world. what apparently, it did, the fiberoptic connections, they tabbed into. they put a clip on or had a way to monitor what was going through those fiberoptic cables. that's something we've learned from snowden that they've been doing around the world. but it's particularly disturbing that it's done with google. google is unique. it's the only entim tientity in that has a mission to collect all the world's snfgs. remember, the nsa is only collecting information about people that they think are a threat to the united states and others. >> so, scott, some of the biggest names in high-tech are now working with the obama administrati administration what does this say about the government's handle on tech nothing. >> i think it was obviously a black eye. something this big should have been rolled out with a lot more test iing. anybody that's in the business knows that you do
edward snowden. >>> well changes on the security clearance system for the federal workers could be in the wakes of the shootings. and they had a hearing on the advocacy of the clearances. the question is how did they get that security clearance despite a series of violent outbursts and repeated brushes with the law? >>> syria has destroyed their weapons. they started in september when they broke the agreement for syria. and this after the obama administration threatened military action against the syrian government. >> we are now in a position to conduct any further productional mixing of chemical weapons, as far as they are disclosed. and that is suppose to have happen for them by next summer. >>> be careful if you are out in georgetown tonight. they will be out and about later. there's no crooks on out there who needed to rip off three people just this past tuesday. one in wisconsin avenue, one on o street and one at m and thomas jefferson street. that robert was last seen wearing the blue jeans, riding the pegs on the back. >>> and they will not miss the scaffolding, but they
condition. what investigators have uncovered about a possible motive for that attack. >>> and edward snowden is out with a new manifesto and is asking for clemency from the u.s. why he basically says he did the american government a favor. that's next. i'm a careful investor. when you do what i do, you think about risk. i don't like the ups and downs of the market, but i can't just sit on my cash. i want to be prepared for the long haul. ishares minimum volatility etfs. investments designed for a smoother ride. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. if yand you're talking toevere rheuyour rheumatologistike me, about trying or adding a biologic. this is humira, adalimumab. this is humira working to help relieve my pain. this is humira helping me through the twists and turns. this is humira helping to protect my joints from further dam
now. >>> edward snowden's request for clemency getting a thumbs down from the white house. >>> a fireball burning through a montreal neighborhood. >> oh my god that is not cool. >>> passengers at an airport were shocked when a small alligator was found under an escalator. >>> from 55 away, colts go to 6-2. >> seven touchdown passes for nick foles, that equals an nfl record. >> and all that matter. >> toronto's embattled mayor vows to ride the storm out after accusations he was caught on video smoking crack. >> i am not perfect. i have made mistakes. >>> auction day. >> oprah winfrey auctioned off some of her personal belongings over the weekend. >> usually gayle comes by my house on the weekends and says if you don't want that i do. >> announcer: "cbs this morning" brought to you by toyota, let's go places. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." norah o'donnell is off. margaret brennan is with us. good morning. >> it is so great to be here with you charlie. >>> we begin here the man charged with killing a tsa officer at los angeles international airport, investigators say paul
, thank you with that live update from fairfax county. >>> the fallout from edward snowden and his leaks continue. "the washington post" says the national security agency broke into communication centers for yahoo and google in order to steal millions of communications records from those companies. nsa director though general keith alexander denies that report. he is also denying a report that the nsa spied on the vatican. the italian magazine panorama says the nsa recorded vatican phone calls and may have eavesdropped on the conclave when the cardinals selected pope francis. >>> the justice department has joined a lawsuit against the firm which conducted the background check of nsa leaker edward snow denial. the suit was -- snowden. the suit was filed by a former employee of the national investigations service. the lawsuit claims the government was billed for background checks which were not completed properly. the just department says it's going to file its own legal complaint in this case coming up in january. >>> a report from the government accountability office finds contract guard
unknown by the president if it was. david ignatius can you put this in perspective and snowden's role. is he still such a menace or is he revealing things we need to know? >> first about nsa collection, it seems increasingly clear if nsa could collect a signal it would. and just add to this ever greater pile of data. analysts couldn't possibly have gone through and made sense of all the signals that they had access to. in terms of spying on the world leaders, the 35 world leaders which is the latest thing that's riled the europeans and people all over the world, it's hard to imagine, if you captured something of interest from angela merkel's cell phone that reference to that wouldn't end up in the president's daily brief. may not say obtained through surveillance of her cell phone but the intelligence would be there otherwise why would you have it? snowden revelations, just keep rolling at the world and at the obama administration. i'm surprised there's not more push back because it's triggered a response by major nations, france, germany, even britain that's been our partner said it
on and on and on. one assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and suprt the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and beli
it was an september. sorry, wrong frederick, but how are you doing? >> edward snowden's nsa revelations reaching new heights, getting spoofed on snl. but now the leaker is seeking ce clemens city. >>> and toronto's embattled mayor says he will stay in office. >>> and the sbepgs intentional that was the youtube music awards. that's a real thing? it is? okay. this is "way too early". good morning. i'm bill karins in for brian shactman. it's monday, november 4th. we'll also show and you scary moment
given to him by edward snowden tweeted that the newspaper will publish a revelation today. >>> the howard county police officer shot during a confrontation with a suspect is now recovering at home. he was discharged sunday from the hospital. officer steven houk was injured last wednesday when he and other officers confronted a man wandering in front of a car carership on route 1 in lawferl. that -- in laurel. that man stephon prather is being held without bond. >>> a love triangle leaves three dead -- excuse me -- in an apparent murder-suicide in glen bernie. officers found the body of 27- year-old firefighter andrew hoffman and his girlfriend marie hartman inside hoffman's home early sunday morning. investigators say both were shot to death by a baltimore city police officer christopher robinson before robinson then turned the gun on himself. hoffman was a third generation firefighter who just last july was honored for safely returning a wandering toddler home. >> it just shows you a lot of character on this young man who was tragically gunned down in this murder-suicide.
. edward snowden wrote an open letter published in a german magazine. he calls it manifesto for truth. jim scuitto, what does he include? >> he tries to make the case that he's not a spy, but a whistle-blower on what he calls the global problem of mass surveillance. in this her he calls the u.s. and britain the worst offenders, and condemns them. the debate he says, quote, they wanted to avoid is now taking place in countries around the world, he wrote, instead of causes damage, the use is causing society to push for political reforms, oversight and new laws. >> i spoke to a senior state department official about this, is snowden had a legal means. he could have pursued it in the nsa, taken it up to the inspector general. if that wasn't good enough, he could have gone to court. in fact he's saying he could come back and face the charge in course. that's the legal way to pursue his case. his position, of course, is he won't get a fair trial here. >> the whole issue of u.s./iranian relations. today we saw a huge demonstration marking the 23rd anniversary of the takeover of the -- what does t
. that's according to secret documents from edward snowden. meanwhile they're rejecting allegations that they spied on the vatican. officials say the story from an italian magazine says that's not true. >>> the boston red sox are world choips. last night they beat st. louis 6-1. here's the scene at fenway park. it's given the city a much needed boost. mark phillips is in the city. good morning, mark. >> what an inning. the crowd in here stood up and got louder weight for the magical moment. the triumph of perseverance. >> the red sox are the world series. >> reporter: bed lamb in boston. thousands of fans poured into the streets to celebrate the world series championship. ite tess first time in 95 years the red sox have won the world series. david ortiz was the world series mvp. >> this is for you, boston. you guys deserve it. >> reporter: outside of fenway park, groups of fans ran through the streets pushing over cars, some were pushed over. boston is where tragedy struck six months earlier. ever since the tragedy in april, the motto for the team is boston strong. players grew bear
a literal run in with a camera. >> usa today, edward snowden has a new job working for a russian website. it starts earlier this month. they didn't name the company for security reasons. "the washington post," employees of the department of homeland security may have boosted their pay with overtime they didn't earn. with o.t., it's $8.7 million a year. this tactic could add money to a paycheck and used to recruit new workers. >>> san diego union tribune, a police officer issued what many believe is the first ticket for driving while wearing google glass. oh, my god. this woman was caught after being caught for speeding. she plans to fight the ticket. it was blocking her vision and causing a distraction. >>> from "the washington post," the moment air travelers have been waiting for. as long as they don't allow talking on phones. >> what? >> the faa finally agreed to let passengers use electronic devices like tablets and phones throughout flights. >> oh, my gosh. >> reporter: on this halloween travel day with costumes on full display at the airport, there was a treat awaiting travelers. >>
story from snowden is that the white house doesn't seem to know what's going on. if they don't know what's going on, they definitely can't do anything about it or have any control over it. so where do you draw that line? >> and this is split, some democrats, you have some liberals and libertarians who are absolutely -- it just bugs them what's going on with nsa. >> well, and rightfully so. i would say to kai kas casey's there has to be transparency and accountability. i agree the senate and congress should have known at least something about what was happening in terms of who was being wiretapped. and i agree that's an issue. need to figure it out. >> this is a management issue. there's something at nsa, whatever you want to call it, management issue in the intelligence committee, all these reform, something is missing. we'll talk a little state politics, virginia, may sneak in some ohio there. up next, lessons to learn. it's a deep dive into the rocky rollout from ten years ago. what the obama administration believes it can learn from glitches and if i cans that surrounded the start of
others. and first moscow, now berlin, former american contractor edward snowden says he will help a u.s. -- a german investigation into u.s. surveillance programs. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. a high-ranking taliban official says the leader of the taliban and pakistan has been killed in a u.s. drone strike. the missiles s
assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and support the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and believe
's been talked about edward snowden getting clemency. he has asked for that. should he get clemency? >> no. he's not getting clemency. the fact he broke the law, he stole classified material. what i ask the question is, who has been fired at the nsa for being so sloppy, so negligent to allow a 29-year-old to allow a 29-year-old to walk away with highly classified material? nobody has to my knowledge. >> important question. senator leahy, thank you so much for your time this afternoon. we appreciate it. >>> coming up, big news at the supreme court. nbc news justice correspondent pete williams joins me next. stay with us. you're giving away pie? would you like apple or cherry? cherry. oil...or cream? definitely cream. [ male announcer ] never made with hydrogenated oil. oh, yeah. [ male announcer ] always made with real cream. the sound of reddi wip is the sound of joy. see who does good work and compare costs. it doesn't usually work that way with health care. but with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment options and estimates for how much i'll pay. that h
of staff said the same. >>> there -- snowden asked for international support to stop persecution of him. snow deny now says he will testify about the wiretapping if germany grants him asylum. >>> the washington nationals officially named matt williams as their new manager this afternoon. dave owens was in the room and davey johnson, big shoes to fill. >> you're talking about davey and we know how veteranship and sage davey was. matt williams referenced davey during his press conference calling johnson a hall of fame skimmer in his mind. williams has a long -- skipper in his mind. williams has a long way to go to reach that status, but the journey began today. there you have the old classic welcome aboard photo op there, matt williams on the right holding up his new uniform with his favorite number 9 on the back. williams became the fifth field manager in nats history. williams spent the last couple years in arizona as a base coach. williams predecessor johnson was a cool customer, so what is williams? >> i think it's aggressive in every aspect. i think we're going to try to take advanta
. of course putin is more powerful than obama. martha: you know, we learned edward snowden was given a tech job in russia. he was clearly protected by the russian government when we asked in no uncertain terms he please be sent back because of the nsa infractions. that was basically thrown back in our face. you look at the relationship has deteriorated to some extent with israel. you look at our relationship with saudi arabia which is not in any way what it once was on the world stage. and it raises a lot of these questions and, dick cheney, i know it is not going to come as a surprise to anybody he feels this way, but he spoke out about this earlier this week and i want to play that for you. >> if we had a presence over there, if we had been able to continue the policies that we put in place, if we had been able to work to keep governments, establish government that is are stable, willing to defend their own sovereign turf we would be much better off. now we're in a position where our adversaries no longer fear us and our allies no longer trust us. martha: jemu, what do you think about tha
of "the washington journal." a continued clashed over the nsa -- spying leaks from edward snowden. this is the front page of "the financial times." the issue came up yesterday with the heads of the intelligence committee in the house and senate. they were asked if perhaps they would agree with some calls that have been made for edward snowden to receive clemency if he came home to the u.s. to testify in an investigation of the nsa. we will play a little bit of what chairman mike rogers and senator dianne feinstein said in that interview. [video clip] this was an all, american, contractor who was trusted and he stripped our system. if he wasopportunity a whistleblower, to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee and say i have some information you ought to see. maybeld certainly see him both together, maybe separately, but we would have seen him and we would have looked at that information. that did not happen. now he has done this an armistice service to our country. norma's disservice in this country and i believe in no clemen
we have people locked up for a dozen years and we haven't even brought any charges. >> the snowden matter only exacerbates it and makes it more urgent. >> i'm not sitting here and playing defense attorney. like padea we held him on bogus charges -- so there we go. we stayed away -- >> the sabin story was unbelievable. >> we all watched "60 minutes." >> apologize for miami. >> he said it reflected very poorly on my character the way i left there. >> a lot of stuff i learned. >> a real regret. never seen regret from nick sabin. he had it last night on "60 minutes." now go to your affordable care act. we should do more than kick the president around. >> according to the associated press, 3.5 million americans have been issued cancellation notices. >> but the president -- >> think about this. you want 7 million signed up but right now you have 3.5 million kicked off. it's about 5% that are going to experience this upgrade or this move to another plan not being able to see their doctors. listen to me. >> if you like -- >> in the grand scheme of things, it's a small number and it should
were talking about is how remarkable it would be that edward snowden might have known about this and barack obama didn't. then the other thing that strikes me is, you know, obviously i under that these programs are very controversial but the amount of controversy over this program is a little bit higher it seems than when we found out they were collecting bulk data on regular citizens. diane feinstein the chairman of the senate intelligence committee is outraged over this disclosure but fine with the other ones. >> what's worse to express, mike barnacle, that i think it's many world leaders that have this happen to them not just angela merkel and i wonder if that should have come out or if that creates more of a firestorm. but, again, it's not george w. bush sitting there with his head phones on listening to angela merkel's conversations, or president obama, it's very different. mike? >> but, mike, if the president knows, if he's getting this intel and if these reports are right that the white house and the state department signed off on it he knows without sitting there wi
from finding out. with wicki leaks and aircraft snow den -- snowden spilling our beans every day, it's the biggest secret left in washington, d.c. the national security administration could learn some lessons from secretary sebelius. see wee shouldn't have to rely on anonymous sources to get basic information about what's happening with obamacare. therefore i'm introducing legislation today to require the administration to answer the following questions every week, how many people tried to sign up, how many people did sign up, what level of insurance did they buy, in what zip code do they live, and what are they doing to fix the problems? this is not complicated information. in the internet age, the administration ought to be able to provide this information not every week but every day. in fact, they should be able to provide it every minute. we shouldn't have to pass a law to find these things out. i would hope every senator would support this simple request that this ladies and, this legislati. it is a six-page bill. i'll put it in the congressional record today and everyone will
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)